Results tagged “commute” from Hawk Talk - Christian

As I sit here in my warm and cozy blue-walled room, I began to reminisce on the past week.  From December 19 to December 27, 2008 (9:26am to be exact), tons and tons of things happened - finals, two winter storms, the holiday rush at Hallmark, finishing up Christmas presents,  Christmas, "The New Black Friday," and my friends' little Kelly's Roast Beef Christmas party.  It doesn't seem like a lot to many people, but to me, as that laid back kid who takes everything easy (kind of), it's definitely enough for me to stay in bed for days! 

So to make life simple for my blog readers, I'm going to blog about my experiences during that small week and give you the inside look of what I did and how I felt during the storms, Christmas, and others that I mentioned before.  Honestly, I'm not here to blog all about me (even if it's going to end up like that), but I'm just putting myself out there just to see if you all had the same experiences during this week.  I'm definitely welcoming all of your comments!!!!



So let's start off my first blog in the series with a bunch of photos from the first Winter Storm:


Storm1a.jpg
This is me driving in Wakefield by the lake.  You can't really see it, but it was snowing very heavily.  This was part of my 2 hour trek home from Wilmington to Malden, MA.

Storm3a.jpg
Here is the picture of the lake... oh, I mean snow and fog hovering over the lake.  The storm #1's visibility was probably less than 100 feet.  That itself made my commute home even worse.

Storm4a.jpg
That white thing in the back is my car covered in snow.  My family was in the process of clearing out my dad's car.  My car was never really cleared off until Monday due to ice and more snow.

Storm6a.jpg
This is the Malden Station intersection at Exchange St.  Obviously the storm blanketed the streets and sidewalks.  You can't even tell where the sidewalk is!!


I think my photos basically tell you this:  THIS STORM WAS BAD HORRENDOUS!!!!  My street was never plowed completely either.  When they finally plowed my street out, they dumped everything on front of my house.  So my shoveled out driveway was once again (actually it happened three times) covered in snow - thank you plowers!  Despite the circumstances, I still braved out the storm with two LONG drives.  My first drive was from Wilmington to Malden, which took two hours.  I seriously thought I was not going to make it because my Mazda 3 was slipping everywhere!  I've never had problems driving in the snow with my car, since it's has front-wheel drive, but I guess the storm was too strong for my little car.  My second drive was my trek to pick up my sister at Malden Station.  This time I used my dad's Subaru Outback, which has 4WD.  That trek took 45minutes to an hour which included waiting for my sister's train.  After the end of a night full of daredevil driving and shoveling to exhaustion (sorry it's not called the Wingate Anaerobic Test), I jumped into my bed and went to sleep.


Since my car was buried in snow from Storm #1 and Storm #2, and altogether iced up for days, I had to get rides home to work the next couple of days to and from work, which was also not pretty commute-wise.  In a sentence or so, Storm #2 was like Storm #1 except that it didn't dump that much snow and it was shorter.  But they both had the same results - horrible driving conditions, near-to-blind whiteout driving, and a major headache at the end of the night.

Through all of this, I'm happy to say my back did not hurt from shoveling!!  You have to thank the physical therapists at work for showing their patients and me how to shovel correctly!

That's enough about the "Twin Storms" for now...
-Christian

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My next blog will focus on the Holiday Rush. - CT

Welcome Back!!!

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After months of just laying around, working, coaching baseball, and other fun stuff, I managed to get myself up around 7am in the morning, eat a good breakfast, get ready, and head up to Lowell for my first day of classes.  The commute up to UML wasn't too bad.  Traffic on Rt. 128/I-95 was a bit slow, but it was never a crawl.  Overall the commute was a good 40 minute drive, which was considered a normal run up to Lowell. 

But there was one thing that surprised me the most:  I got to avoid the annual first day parking crunch.  How I managed not to get into that is just one big mystery to me.  You can say I was really lucky.  I drove into the "VIP Lot"  (check my March or April blogs about some terminology my buddies and I made up) and found my favorite parking space vacant.  (Score!)  Right away, the start of my senior year was going better than expected.  I got to see all my EP buddies again after 3 months of nothing.  We all just had this similar feeling:  surprised...  "I can't believe we're seniors."   After 3 long years with hardcore science GPA classes, we were there looking at each other knowing this will be the last semester/year together.  At that point, I didn't even feel like a senior.  It just felt like the first time we all met each other in Professor Chamberlain's Intro to EP class (and yes, the get up, get your number and address exercise). 

I had 4 classes that day:  Research Methods in EP, Exercise Prescription and Programming, Health Care Systems, and (oh man) Vitamins and Minerals.  My first two EP classes were as expected, which was just a quick intro into senior year.  We watched a video about Universal Precautions and about HIPPA (look it up).  Health Care Systems was just a quick intro too.  But there was one class that caught me by surprise:  Vitamins and Minerals.  At first, I thought it would be a general class about vitamins and minerals and its use, but it all came up to be a very detailed and structural biochemistry class.  The professor was extremely nice and intelligent, but the information that I absorbed did not match what I expected.  Besides, there were a few graduate students in there who were there because it was required.  I basically planned to take that class to fulfill my nutrition minor.  So after 3 hours of "what the heck I am doing here"  I went into the library, looked up ISIS, checked my credits for the semester and found out that if I dropped the class I will still be a full-time student.  The only bummer is that I have to wait until the spring semester to make up that one class.  My original plan was to keep 5 classes for the fall and 4 classes for the spring, but obviously that's going to get switched around.  Oh well.

I definitely have more to blog about my past weekend, the Lowell Spinners game (Thanks Elaine!), and other stuff about my first week.  So please come back and read some more!

- If you have any questions about the college or about my commute, email me Christian_Tiongson@student.uml.edu. 

Christian


P.S.  I found this video in one of my blogs.  It was a video of me driving from Malden/Melrose line to Lowell in a 11 minute stint.  Don't worry it's a compacted quick video:  Click here to watch my video!

 

It has been exactly 10 days since my last final, and the start of my summer.  Honestly, it feels like its been a few months since my last final.  It feels like this because I've been working a lot already... and being lazy at home.  I've made a few plans for the summer already, which includes finding a new job - most particularly a physical therapy aide job or anything along the lines, coaching my baseball team to the playoffs (we're in 3rd place), continuing my UML blog, study for my certification for the strength and conditioning specialist, and taking a trip somewhere.  While it seems like I'm going to be very busy, my definite goal is to relax, take it easy, and spend some time with my family and friends.  I'm going to spend some time playing my guitar, record some music, try to start an art piece, spend some time at the beach, and just enjoy nature with hiking or mountain biking. 

Remember, the summer time doesn't mean your learning ends for 3 months.  If you are "behind" with classes (like a lack of General Education credits) or you want lessen the load of your semester, you can take one or two summer classes.  Last summer, I took Human Biochemistry for the whole month of June, so I can lessen my load for the fall.  Sure, the issue of commuting to campus, such as high gas prices, or the urge to just sit in the beach may be an obstacle, but I think that its worthwhile.  Maybe its just me, but summer classes are more laidback and less stresful.  I think this is so, because I didn't have to take my normal class-load (5 classes), and I had more time to study. 

High schoolers, please don't look at summer classes as "summer school."  It's not a punishment!  It is a great way to stay on track for graduation, or even get a head start! 

Well, the Celtics Game 6 game is distracting me right now - the current score is 74 - 74 in the 4th quarter with 5:25 to go.  Pierce just got fouled with a 2 pointer.  He has a chance to give the Celts a one point lead... okay I better stop now before I end up writing a whole blog about the game!!

Have a good day!

Christian  

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