Hwang, SeungHyeon : August 2012 Archives

If you haven't read the first part, go ahead and read it right here. I shall continue!

Let me start off by saying that yes, I secured the internship with the Boston Bruins! Needless to express, I am extremely excited and thankful for the opportunity. As I was writing that previous blog, I had already received a phone call from the Bruins telling me that things were looking good. It was a huge confidence booster and made me more optimistic. Things just fell into place the way I wanted it to. I realized later that this internship was a tough get and I panned out. People congratulated me and told me that I should be happy and proud. The only word I can think of and really relate to is "thankful."

So I had a week or two to sit back and really think about what is ahead of me. I know for a fact that many students are or have been at where I am at currently. I only have a year of college left and the real world is right before my eyes. It's been a confusing and ambitious thought process, and to be honest, I still think about it every night. Allow me to elaborate a bit.

Inevitably, the biggest thing facing the class of 2013 is the job market. I am sure that the previous grads also had trouble with the market, but the market isn't all that strong and competition is all around the country. Massachusetts is a pretty competitive state when it comes to securing jobs. Because of these reasons, I cannot help but to think and question myself. Did I do enough and am I good enough to obtain a job? Even if it's a year away, it seems like it's getting closer day by day. Too close almost.

I think being concerned about the future is enough, but tie that in with all the little stresses of life, you are guaranteed to get a little crazy. Maybe some students don't over-think like I do (I am jealous), so it may be hard to relate. When I'm by myself, I think about too many things and over analyze things a bit too much. I know other students that go through the same process and we all should realize that it's not the healthiest thing for our lives.

Now here is my attempt to ridiculously tie my internship into all of those things. As I have mentioned, I did not expect anything when I sent in my application for the internship. I took the challenge head on if you will, and did not fear the result. I've had the same approach with a lot of things throughout my life and it mostly turned out for the better. Instead of worrying so much about the little things, I made a decision and took it in stride. I have lost my way a little bit in the last couple of weeks with so much thinking, but I'm trying to remind myself how I even got here in the first place. I encourage all of you to do the same if you are going through a similar time as I am.

Next blog, I would love to discuss the article on the Globe Magazine about UMass Lowell with Marty Meehan, our chancellor. It was a good read and you can find that here.

Til next time,

-Andy

Go for it

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Hey guys. Hope all of you are doing well. Almost a month until we go back to the regular grind of classes! Get ready for another great year! It will be my last.

So in a previous blog I mentioned that I got to talk to the Boston Bruins Director of Marketing. As I mentioned, he inspired and gave me excellent advice on my future career. One of the things he mentioned is the importance of an internship. He told me that most people in his field have done some sort of an internship and it was critical in the hiring process. But he also mentioned that it's not just about getting that internship, it's leaving a mark and letting them remember you with your hard work and dedication.

With the upcoming semester and my financial situation, I didn't think it was entirely possible that I could commit full-time to the internship. The travel costs were very expensive (I'd have to take the train), classes were crammed together, and things just didn't fall into place. It didn't make a whole lot of sense.

I thought about it for a long time after our meeting. I pictured every possible scenario but it didn't make sense, especially financially. I needed to pay rent and living expenses throughout the year. The travel cost alone was going to be a hefty amount every month for the duration of the internship.

But something suddenly hit me. It was like getting hit with something on the head, sort of a wake up call. Everything I've thought about so far was an excuse. If I really wanted this, then I'd be going after it without fear. My conservative attitude was holding me back. I couldn't sit there and say "I could have." Without fear, I grabbed my laptop and prepared my resume and cover letter. Thing is, I mentioned my situation and clarified my available commitment in the cover letter. I mailed it without having big expectations.

Needless to say, I was surprised when I got a call to arrange an interview. I arranged for the interview the next day (I'm guessing they were short on time), and went in there having prepared as much as I could. I just wanted to show them the person I was, rather than a person I'm trying to be at an interview, if that makes any sense.

Unfortunately, I thought I bombed the interview. I stuttered on a few questions, stumbled upon a couple words, and didn't think they were too impressed. That train ride home was not a fun one because I thought to myself too much. Yes, too much.

I'm still awaiting the results of the interview but hopefully it will be good news. Nothing is confirmed yet but I do have a good feeling about it. That sort of contradicts what I just said in the previous paragraph doesn't it? I'll explain in my next blog. I don't want to jinx things if you know what I mean.

Hope you check out my next blog!

-Andy

About this Archive

This page is a archive of recent entries written by Hwang, SeungHyeon in August 2012.

Hwang, SeungHyeon : July 2012 is the previous archive.

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