Artbotics holds two shows in Lowell as part of Boston Cyberarts 2011 Festival

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On April 26, undergraduate students in the Spring 2011 Artbotics class at UMass Lowell held an opening of “Play” at the 119 Gallery. At the same time, Lowell High School students opened their Artbotics show,  “The Other Side,” held at The Revolving Museum. Both institutions are part of Lowell arts community, and partners with UMass Lowell.

The undergraduate Artbotics class was co-taught by Computer Science Professor Holly Yanco, Fine Arts Professor Ellen Wetmore, and UML alumnus Adam Norton. Adam is also the co-instructor of the after-school Artbotics program for high school students at the Revolving Museum.

The whole Artbotics project was launched with a grant from the National Science Foundation in 2006, and these two shows were part of the Boston Cyberarts 2011 Festival.
 
A party atmosphere reigned at both openings, with students celebrating each other’s achievements. Live video-streaming enabled participants to see what was happening at the other exhibit, several city blocks away. A bus shuttled guests, students, faculty, and staff from one exhibit to the other.
 
The interactive pieces at the 119 Gallery included the Trash Monster, created by Fine Arts majors Julia Donigian and Alyssa McCann. The monsters were set in a landfill of debris, designed with motors and sensors to jump up to see who dared to awake them from their slumber. The monsters were modeled to mimic the personalities and look of their creators.

Simply Over Engineered, by Computer Science major Eric McCann, performed a swaying give-and-take dance with the viewer, representing over 60 hours of design time. The steam-punk robotic arm had a multitude of sensors and used pulleys, ball bearings, gears, belts and an Arduino microcontroller, enabling it to perform its magical movement.

City Scape by Kristin Morrisey transfixed the viewer with the glistening Boston city skyline at nightfall. Large sheets of metal collided with one another to create thunder in English major Kristen Dubis’ piece titled Nerves.
 
A movie highlighting each of the projects exhibited at the 119 Gallery is below.

Undergraduate artists and technologists: Jonathan Cloutier, Christopher Conklin, Brian Demerjian, Julia Donigian, Kristen Dubis, Samantha Durant, Laura Eames, Duy Hoang, Dung Le, Christopher Lopez, Patrick Lynch, Nathan Maillet, Eric McCann, Alyssa McCann, Kristin Morrissey, Ian Ndicu, Jared Peters, Juan Rios and Tuan Vu.

laura-eames-flowers.jpg
Laura Eames prepares her Flowers piece for exhibit. Inspired by Arthur Ganson, Laura created flowers with petals that moved up and down when a viewer approached the piece.

chris-conlkin-hold-your-applause.jpg
Chris Conklin designed four sets of clapping wire hands for his exhibit, each triggered by movement in front of its distance sensor.

nathan-maillet-music-in-motion.jpg
Nathan Maillet created an interactive xylophone.  Viewers played songs on an octave's notes by moving their hands in front of the piece's eight sensors.



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This page contains a single entry by Martin, Fred published on May 24, 2011 5:04 PM.

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