Five present at New England Undergraduate Computing Symposium

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Five Computer Science undergraduates presented at the 3rd Annual New England Undergraduate Computing Syposium (NEUCS), held on April 9, 2011 at Tufts University.

The event is supported by the Empowering Leadership Alliance, and is organized to “celebrate excellence and diversity in undergraduate computing in New England.” Past NEUCS symposia were held at Wellesley College and Boston University.

As in the past, this year’s event attracted a wide range of undergraduate student work, including research projects, course projects, and personal projects. 

Five UMass Lowell undergraduates presented at the conference:

  • Krithika Manohar and Kyle Monico presented “Open Source Data Visualization for the Masses,” based on their work on the WEAVE project in Prof. Georges Grinstein’s research group.
  • Eric Fairbanks presented “Repurposing the Nintendo Gameboy for Computational Music,” a personal project in which he developed a custom programmer for the classic GameBoy platform, and is writing code to generate computational music.
The symposium was a great opportunity for networking, sharing, and appreciating the range of creative work done by the region’s undergraduate computing students.

Fairbanks’ poster, which included a large image of a GameBoy device, attracted a lot of attention.  Afterward, he commented that “I met some cool people, and it was fun to learn they were really interested in what I was doing.”

Students from UMass Lowell have participated in all three years that the event has been running, and the Computer Science department may host a future NEUCS symposium.

neucs2011.jpg
UMass Lowell students at the NEUCS 2011 event. From L-R: Eric Fairbanks, Mario Barrenechea (UMass Amherst), Kyle Monico, Patrick Stickney, Krithika Manohar, and John Fallon.

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This page contains a single entry by Martin, Fred published on April 15, 2011 4:35 PM.

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